Snoring and Sleep Apnea

Getting a good night’s sleep is an essential part of maintaining good health. However, many people don’t get the sleep they need as a result of their own or their partner’s sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD).

When the soft tissues near the back of the throat collapse during sleep, they partially close off the windpipe. Snoring occurs when these tissues — the tongue, for example —vibrate as air passes. Loud snoring often disturbs the person in the bed who isn't the one doing it, robbing him or her of vital sleep. While the snorer may seem to be slumbering peacefully, the chronic loud snoring may be symptomatic of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. This condition occurs when the upper airway is blocked to the extent that it causes significant airflow disruption, or fully stops airflow for 10 or more seconds.

A person with sleep apnea may wake almost once every minute without having any memory of doing so. These awakenings last just long enough to restore muscle tone to the airway so the individual can breathe. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a serious matter that prevents restful sleep, can lower blood-oxygen levels and can lead to heart problems and other health issues.

It’s possible you may have OSA if you snore and also suffer from any of the following:

  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Irritability
  • Poor memory/confusion
  • Accident proneness
  • Night sweats
  • Morning headaches
  • High blood pressure
  • Obesity
  • Erectile dysfunction

Fortunately, snoring or sleep apnea can sometimes be treated with an oral appliance available at the dental office. The appliance is designed to hold the lower jaw forward during sleep to shift the tongue away from the back of the throat and reduce the potential for obstruction. Backed by a great deal of scientific evidence, this treatment is a good remedy to try before moving on to more complicated breathing devices or surgery to remove excess tissues in the throat.

If you or a loved one is experiencing any combination of the signs and symptoms above, schedule a consultation with an Amara Dental dentist trained to fabricate, fit, adjust, monitor and treat complications associated with Oral Appliance Therapy used in managing SRBD.

Snoring and Sleep Apnea

Getting a good night’s sleep is an essential part of maintaining good health. However, many people don’t get the sleep they need as a result of their own or their partner’s sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD).

When the soft tissues near the back of the throat collapse during sleep, they partially close off the windpipe. Snoring occurs when these tissues — the tongue, for example —vibrate as air passes. Loud snoring often disturbs the person in the bed who isn't the one doing it, robbing him or her of vital sleep. While the snorer may seem to be slumbering peacefully, the chronic loud snoring may be symptomatic of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. This condition occurs when the upper airway is blocked to the extent that it causes significant airflow disruption, or fully stops airflow for 10 or more seconds.

A person with sleep apnea may wake almost once every minute without having any memory of doing so. These awakenings last just long enough to restore muscle tone to the airway so the individual can breathe. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a serious matter that prevents restful sleep, can lower blood-oxygen levels and can lead to heart problems and other health issues.

It’s possible you may have OSA if you snore and also suffer from any of the following:

  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Irritability
  • Poor memory/confusion
  • Accident proneness
  • Night sweats
  • Morning headaches
  • High blood pressure
  • Obesity
  • Erectile dysfunction

Fortunately, snoring or sleep apnea can sometimes be treated with an oral appliance available at the dental office. The appliance is designed to hold the lower jaw forward during sleep to shift the tongue away from the back of the throat and reduce the potential for obstruction. Backed by a great deal of scientific evidence, this treatment is a good remedy to try before moving on to more complicated breathing devices or surgery to remove excess tissues in the throat.

If you or a loved one is experiencing any combination of the signs and symptoms above, schedule a consultation with an Amara Dental dentist trained to fabricate, fit, adjust, monitor and treat complications associated with Oral Appliance Therapy used in managing SRBD.

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