Periodontal Dentistry

Periodontists are expert at treating periodontal disease and replacing missing teeth with dental implants.

Periodontal therapy can take various forms, but the goal is always to restore diseased tissues to health. Gum (periodontal) disease can spread from the gums to the bone that supports the teeth, and may even cause tooth loss in the most severe cases. There are very effective therapies to combat this, ranging from antibiotics applied by your dentist, to surgical repair of lost gum and bone tissue.

Periodontal therapy includes both surgical and non-surgical techniques:

  • Scaling and Root Planing: These deep-cleaning techniques are the best starting point to control gum disease. Using hand scalers or ultrasonic instruments, plaque and tartar are removed from beneath the gum tissues.
  • Gum Grafting: Sometimes it's necessary to replace areas of lost gum tissue to adequately protect tooth roots. This can be accomplished by moving healthy gum tissue from another area of the mouth or by using laboratory-processed donor tissue.
  • Periodontal Plastic Surgery: When used to describe surgery, the word "plastic" refers to any reshaping procedure that creates a more pleasing appearance of the gum tissues.
  • Periodontal Laser Treatment: Removing diseased gum tissue with lasers offers significant advantages, such as less discomfort and gum shrinkage.
  • Crown Lengthening Surgery: For cosmetic reasons  or to aid in securing a new dental crown, this surgical procedure exposes tooth structure that is covered by gum and bone tissue.
  • Dental Implants: Today's preferred method of tooth replacement is a titanium dental implant, which is then attached to a realistic-looking dental.
  • Arestin: This antibiotic is applied by your dentist and helps to kill bacteria that cause gum disease.

The Connection Between Oral Health and General Health

Did you know that diseases of the mouth — like gum disease — have been linked to those of the body? Studies have found that moderate to severe periodontitis tends to increase the level of systemic inflammation, which may smolder in the background, awaiting the right conditions to flare into a more serious disease. Since chronic inflammation is a whole-body problem, it’s best to begin controlling it via a whole-body approach: maintaining a healthy weight, getting moderate exercise, quitting tobacco habits and controlling untreated inflammatory diseases (like periodontitis).

Studies have found a link between periodontal disease, heart disease, and other systemic conditions. That’s why it’s important not to wait if periodontal problems occur. The sooner you have treatment, the better your chances for controlling gum disease — and perhaps systemic diseases too.

Periodontal Dentistry

Periodontists are expert at treating periodontal disease and replacing missing teeth with dental implants.

Periodontal therapy can take various forms, but the goal is always to restore diseased tissues to health. Gum (periodontal) disease can spread from the gums to the bone that supports the teeth, and may even cause tooth loss in the most severe cases. There are very effective therapies to combat this, ranging from antibiotics applied by your dentist, to surgical repair of lost gum and bone tissue.

Periodontal therapy includes both surgical and non-surgical techniques:

  • Scaling and Root Planing: These deep-cleaning techniques are the best starting point to control gum disease. Using hand scalers or ultrasonic instruments, plaque and tartar are removed from beneath the gum tissues.
  • Gum Grafting: Sometimes it's necessary to replace areas of lost gum tissue to adequately protect tooth roots. This can be accomplished by moving healthy gum tissue from another area of the mouth or by using laboratory-processed donor tissue.
  • Periodontal Plastic Surgery: When used to describe surgery, the word "plastic" refers to any reshaping procedure that creates a more pleasing appearance of the gum tissues.
  • Periodontal Laser Treatment: Removing diseased gum tissue with lasers offers significant advantages, such as less discomfort and gum shrinkage.
  • Crown Lengthening Surgery: For cosmetic reasons  or to aid in securing a new dental crown, this surgical procedure exposes tooth structure that is covered by gum and bone tissue.
  • Dental Implants: Today's preferred method of tooth replacement is a titanium dental implant, which is then attached to a realistic-looking dental.
  • Arestin: This antibiotic is applied by your dentist and helps to kill bacteria that cause gum disease.

The Connection Between Oral Health and General Health

Did you know that diseases of the mouth — like gum disease — have been linked to those of the body? Studies have found that moderate to severe periodontitis tends to increase the level of systemic inflammation, which may smolder in the background, awaiting the right conditions to flare into a more serious disease. Since chronic inflammation is a whole-body problem, it’s best to begin controlling it via a whole-body approach: maintaining a healthy weight, getting moderate exercise, quitting tobacco habits and controlling untreated inflammatory diseases (like periodontitis).

Studies have found a link between periodontal disease, heart disease, and other systemic conditions. That’s why it’s important not to wait if periodontal problems occur. The sooner you have treatment, the better your chances for controlling gum disease — and perhaps systemic diseases too.

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